Environmental Plant Physiology

Subject BOTA30003 (2016)

Note: This is an archived Handbook entry from 2016.

Credit Points: 12.5
Level: 3 (Undergraduate)
Dates & Locations:

This subject has the following teaching availabilities in 2016:

Semester 1, Parkville - Taught on campus.
Pre-teaching Period Start not applicable
Teaching Period 29-Feb-2016 to 29-May-2016
Assessment Period End 24-Jun-2016
Last date to Self-Enrol 11-Mar-2016
Census Date 31-Mar-2016
Last date to Withdraw without fail 06-May-2016

Timetable can be viewed here. For information about these dates, click here.
Time Commitment: Contact Hours: 2 x one hour lectures per week, 24 hours practical work (3 hours per week during the first part of semester)
Total Time Commitment:

Estimated total time commitment of 170 hours


One of

Study Period Commencement:
Credit Points:
Semester 2
Corequisites: None
Recommended Background Knowledge: None
Non Allowed Subjects: None
Core Participation Requirements:

For the purposes of considering request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Cwth 2005), and Student Support and Engagement Policy, academic requirements for this subject are articulated in the Subject Overview, Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Generic Skills sections of this entry.

It is University policy to take all reasonable steps to minimise the impact of disability upon academic study, and reasonable adjustments will be made to enhance a student's participation in the University's programs. Students who feel their disability may impact on meeting the requirements of this subject are encouraged to discuss this matter with a Faculty Student Adviser and Student Equity and Disability Support: http://services.unimelb.edu.au/disability


Prof Ian Woodrow



Subject Overview:

This subject deals with how plants function in relation to changing physical environments and is designed for students interested in plant biology and physiology, including those seeking majors in plant science, agricultural science, landscape management, and environmental science. The practical work includes a six-week research project on topics selected by students and run in small groups of 2-3.

Topics to be covered will include:

  • coping with environmental extremes and stress;
  • water use and drought tolerance;
  • plant defence and plant-animal interactions;
  • nutrient cycling and nutrient-use efficiency;
  • hyperaccumulation of toxic metals and phytoremediation.
Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of this subject, students should have a knowledge of:

  • plant function and performance in relation to the environment;

  • plant responses to various biotic and abiotic factors; and

  • the role of plants in global nutrient and carbon cycling.


Laboratory test during the semester (10%); practical reports totalling up to 2000 words due during the semester (30%); a 2-hour written examination in the examination period (60%).

Prescribed Texts:


Breadth Options:

This subject potentially can be taken as a breadth subject component for the following courses:

You should visit learn more about breadth subjects and read the breadth requirements for your degree, and should discuss your choice with your student adviser, before deciding on your subjects.

Fees Information: Subject EFTSL, Level, Discipline & Census Date

This subject is available for science credit to students enrolled in the BSc (both pre-2008 and new degrees), BASc or a combined BSc course.

Previously known as 606-304 Environmental Plant Physiology (prior to 2010)

Previously known as BOTA30003 (606-304) Functional Plant Biology (prior to 2011)

Related Majors/Minors/Specialisations: Botany
Botany (pre-2008 Bachelor of Science)
Cell Biology (pre-2008 Bachelor of Science)
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Forest Science
Plant Cell Biology and Development (specialisation of Cell and Developmental Biology major)
Plant Science
Science-credited subjects - new generation B-SCI and B-ENG.
Selective subjects for B-BMED

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